Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

The MBA Bride | August 22, 2017

Scroll to top

Top

No Comments

Building Wedding Sentimentality: 3 techniques for inviting people to help you make your wedding unique

With 11 months to go until my own wedding, I’ve been thinking a lot about the countdown and how limited my time is to finish planning. While reflecting, I began to think of how I can really make the wedding unique, which brought me back to an episode of Four Weddings I saw at the beginning of this year.

Among other people, Kitty, a New York bride, was featured in the TV show. Kitty stood out from the others and won the honeymoon of a lifetime because of her drastic sentimentality points. Among other sentimental elements of her wedding, the most inspiring was the gown she wore designed and sewn by her Aunt.

A branding case study I read recently on Chateau Vollois, a wine producer in the rich wine lands of France, reflected a similar value. At the conclusion of the article, one of the analysts commented that the young, bright-eyed, bushy-tailed MBA granddaughter should be invited to work at the vineyard. The value was this: family should always be invited to have a piece of the company’s pie, especially if they show potential for future value. Same thing goes for people helping you plan the wedding.

Sentimentality will greatly distinguish your wedding from others. The best way to embed sentimentality into the wedding is to invite family members to make their mark on the wedding. Here are three ways to identify who should have a piece of your wedding planning pie:

  1. Find the talented. Identify which of your family members or close friends have amazing talents. Do you have an aunt who is an artist? Perhaps she can design your invitations. Or do you have a super crafty family friend who loves to sew? Maybe you should see if she can jazz up your veil.
  2. Rate his or her reliability. On a scale of 1-10, rate the reliability of the talented individual. This will help you determine if you’re taking on more stress (if unreliable) or more relief (if reliable). Only ask people who score an 8 or higher. Think of it like this…if you only had grades to judge, would you hire a C student over an B student? How about a C over an A? Even if they are talented, you need to ensure every person involved in your wedding planning journey helps you be the savvy business bride you are.
  3. Ask nicely. Accept declinations with grace. It’s crucial that you ask those reliable, talented friends or family to help you in a classy way. A request for your musically inclined cousin to play the guitar during the processional would be better received if it were over a private dinner than over the screaming kids at Thanksgiving. Likewise, asking your mother’s childhood friend to bedazzle your bridal footwear would be considered a honor if you sent a sentimental card admiring her handy work and relationship over the years instead of sending a quick one-line email. If a talented, reliable person declines your request to (insert action here), follow up with them and let them know you are OK with their decision. Leave the door open for them to help you in the same way at a later point. Never throw a hissy fit (at least in public) about their declination.

Following these three steps will help you distinguish your wedding in a way that is laced with emotion and is unique. You, too, can have a wedding as sentimental as Kitty’s.

Like the blog? Become a fan.

+1 if you think this post is helpful.

Share with friends via FB, Twitter, email.

Submit a Comment